Employees encouraged to sign up for high reliability training

Donna Nucci, RN, BSN, infection preventionist, Quality Improvement Support Services, discussed safety behaviors during a recent high reliability organization training session on the Saint Raphael Campus. Jerry Diakonikolas, medical technologist, Hematology, also helped lead the session.
Donna Nucci, RN, BSN, infection preventionist, Quality Improvement Support Services, discussed safety behaviors during a recent high reliability organization training session on the Saint Raphael Campus. Jerry Diakonikolas, medical technologist, Hematology, also helped lead the session.

Training on the safety behaviors that will help YNHH become a high reliability organization (HRO) started in February and will continue through Sept. 30.

All employees and medical staff members will attend one of the three-hour HRO training sessions being held at the hospital and in other locations. A schedule and registration are available on Employee Self Service on the hospital intranet by following the link to the course HRO Getting to Zero. Having all employees trained is a 2014 PIP goal, so employees are encouraged to complete training early.

Classes will cover the five safety behaviors indicated by the CHAMP acronym:

Communicate clearly
Handoff effectively
Attention to detail
Mentor each other — 200% accountability
Practice and accept a questioning attitude

Within those safety behaviors are techniques that have been proven to help prevent errors that can lead to patient harm. These error-prevention techniques include read backs/repeat backs with clarifying questions to ensure that a caregiver understands an order or request; crosschecking and coaching colleagues; and speaking up when an employee has a concern.

"Many of these techniques require us to slow down, think and communicate more effectively," said Thomas Balcezak, MD, senior vice president, Safety and Quality. "That can be challenging when you're busy, but the few extra seconds you spend using an error prevention technique can make an enormous difference in patients' safety."