Newsmakers

newsmakers

Clifford Bogue, MD; Marna Borgstrom; Ena Williams, RN, BSN


Clifford W. Bogue, MD, has been named chief of Pediatrics at Yale New Haven Hospital and chair of Pediatrics at Yale School of Medicine. During his career at YNHH and YSM, Dr. Bogue has held a number of leadership positions, including chief medical officer of Yale New Haven Children’s Hospital, chief of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, medical director, Pediatric Intensive Care Unit and director, pediatric critical care fellowship. As interim chief/chair of Pediatrics, Dr. Bogue has led clinical development of Yale New Haven Children’s Hospital’s Pediatric Specialty Center network throughout Connecticut; developed programs contributing to national recognition of YNHCH; and partnered with other hospital leaders on family-centered policies and programs. Dr. Bogue earned his medical degree from the University of Virginia and completed his fellowship in pediatric critical care medicine at Yale School of Medicine.

Marna P. Borgstrom, CEO, Yale New Haven Health System and Yale New Haven Hospital, has been named among the 100 Most Influential People in Healthcare and among the Top 25 Women in Healthcare by Modern Healthcare magazine for 2017. Borgstrom has been with YNHHS since the beginning of her professional career. She received her master's in public health at Yale School of Medicine, and since 1979 has held a variety of staff and leadership roles, serving as president and CEO of YNHHS and YNHH since 2005. Borgstrom also serves on several national and local boards and chairs the Vizient Board (Dallas, TX) and The Coalition to Protect America’s Healthcare (Washington, DC). This is the 16th annual publication of the 100 Most Influential People in Healthcare ranking. Modern Healthcare readers and senior editors chose honorees based on thousands of nominations.

Ena Williams, RN, BSN, interim chief nursing officer, Yale New Haven Hospital, received the National Black Nurses Association (NBNA) 2017 Trailblazer Award in August. Since joining the hospital in 1992 as an operating room staff nurse, she has held a number of leadership positions, including patient service manager and nursing director. As vice president, Patient Services, Williams was part of the senior nursing leadership team that led the hospital to two successful Magnet designations by the American Nurses Credentialing Center. Williams also served as president of the Southern Connecticut Black Nurses Association from 2008 to 2010. The NBNA serves as the voice for black nurses and diverse populations, ensuring equal access to professional development, promoting educational opportunities and improving health.