June-July 2019

In this issue:

Building trust, engagement and the patient experience

A message from Thomas Balcezak, MD, Chief Medical Officer

A very important focus for our health system is how our patients experience and perceive the care they receive. No matter how safe or exceptional the technical aspects of our care may be, if patients lose trust in their caregivers or otherwise become disengaged from the healing process, their health outcomes suffer.

Over the past several years, we have made great strides in moving the patient back to the center of our operations, in large part due to deeply committed physician/nurse leadership dyads charged with building an infrastructure and culture of patient-centeredness. We have started that journey, and have made demonstrable improvements, despite significant challenges like aging physical facilities, increasing patient acuity, increases in volume, and increased burdens on front line caregivers.

Recently, as the inaugural leaders of our patient experience team have moved on, our administrative and clinical leaders spent time reviewing our successes, and identifying how to maintain and accelerate our progress. We were enormously fortunate to recruit a new Chief Experience Officer, Joan Kelley, from NYU, and to name Dr. Alan Friedman as our new Chief Medical Experience Officer. Joan brings a deep experience of leadership on patient experience in complex operational settings, and is able to be a fierce advocate for patients while understanding the unique complexities and challenges of working in an academic healthcare setting.

Al came to New Haven as a fellow in Pediatric Cardiology, joined the faculty, and over the years has served in a succession of leadership roles, including program director for the Pediatric Cardiology fellowship, interim Section Chief of Pediatric Cardiology, President of the Medical Staff, and most recently, Medical Director for Medical Affairs in the Office of the CMO. Those who know Al professionally know him as a humble, deeply empathetic, thoughtful human being and a superlative and dedicated clinician. Over the past several years, since taking a leadership role in Medical Affairs, Al has spoken compellingly about the fundamental, if insufficiently articulated, link between physicians’ professionalism, our sense of personal and professional fulfillment, maintaining a deep connection with patients, and the consequent quality of our patient’s experience of receiving healthcare.

The pace of change in the healthcare can be exhausting, and demands on front line caregivers continue to increase. Many of us struggle to provide effective, efficient, patient-centered and speedy care while staying up to date on documentation and other administrative burdens. Given those challenges, we must find creative solutions that reduce clinician burden while enhancing the patient centeredness of our systems of care.

As Joan and Al work develop their partnership, they will work on enhancing the patient experience by facilitating cultural and operational changes that enhance those crucial connections between clinicians and patients. We are often most rejuvenated by meaningful interactions with our patients. If we are able to make progress in reducing competing demands on caregivers’ times, we will create more opportunities for frontline caregivers to focus on direct patient care, enhancing the patient experience while feeding our professional need for deep and meaningful patient interactions.

This approach to enhancing patient centeredness in our systems of care is but a part of our larger culture change to enhance high reliability in all operations by reducing complexity, addressing patient, employee and physician pain points, and to learn from our experiences in creating a more integrated clinical enterprise.

I ask for your help and input in shaping the focus of our work, and can be reached via at thomas.balcezak@ynhh.org. Happy Summer!

 

Patient Safety and Quality Metrics

12-Month Period

5/17-4/18

6/17-5/18

 7/17-6/18

 8/17-7/18

 9/17-8/18

10/17-9/18

 11/17-10/18

12/17-11/18

1/18-12/18

2/18-1/19

 3/18-2/19  4/18-3/19

C. diff

169

174

 171

 173

 176

 179

 177

179

178

176

 177  185

CAUTI

73

66

 59

 55

 56

 59

 54

56

59

60

 61  62

CLABSI

75

76

 79

 73

 72

 75

 74

69

71

72

 74  81

SSE

16

18

 16

 15

 12

 11

 13

17

21

23

 22  24








 

 

 

   

12-Month Period

3/17-2/18

4/17-3/18

 5/17-4/18

 6/17-5/18

 7/17-6/18

 8/17-7/18

9/17-8/18

10/17-9/18

11/17-10/18

12/17-11/18

   2/18-1/19

Colon SSI

46

41

 41

 43

 45

 44

 50

46

51

51

 50  50

Hysterectomy SSI

9

12

 12

 13

 14

 16

 17

17

18

17

 16  15

PE/DVT

70

68

 70

 66

 69

 67

 63

66

67

69

 72  69

Iatrogenic Pneumothorax

6

6

 5

 6

 7

 6

 6

6

7

7

 7  5

 

The Patient Safety and Quality metrics are reported on a 12-month rolling timeframe. The most recent timeframes differ based upon the various databases reporting the metrics. 12-month rolling total updated with AHRQ v6.0 definition starting January 2017.

Patient Safety and Quality Metric Definitions

Colon and Hysterectomy SSI: A surgical site infection within 30 days of the operative procedure, classified as superficial, deep, or organ/space infections based on CDC/NHSN surveillance definitions.

C. diff (Clostridium difficile): A patient who develops diarrhea greater than 48 hours after admission to an inpatient unit and for whom the C. diff testing (either rapid toxin, cytotoxin or PCR) is positive.

CAUTI (Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infection): A patient who has an indwelling urinary catheter in place for over two days, with at least one of the following signs or symptoms: fever > 38○ C, suprapubic tenderness (with no other recognized cause), costovertebral angle pain/tenderness (with no other recognized cause), urinary urgency (not while catheter in place), urinary frequency (not while catheter in place), or dysuria (not while catheter in place).

CLABSI (Central Line Associated Blood Stream Infection): A primary bloodstream infection (not related to an infection at another site) that develops in a patient with a central line in place over two days before onset of the infection. Culturing the catheter tip is not a criterion for a CLABSI.

Iatrogenic Pneumothorax: A pneumothorax caused by medical care, with certain exclusions for trauma, cardiac and thoracic surgery patients.

PE/DVT (Pulmonary Embolism/Deep Vein Thrombosis): Any PE/DVT that occurs postoperatively.

Serious Safety Event: A deviation from generally expected care that results in moderate to severe patient harm.

 

Clinical redesign project aims to strengthen and streamline sepsis

Nationwide, more than a million people a year develop sepsis, which is an extreme immune response to an infection. In the past, Yale New Haven Health’s delivery networks have taken different approaches to identifying and treating sepsis. That changed last December, when 80 people from throughout the health system formally launched a sepsis clinical redesign project.

The project focuses on quickly identifying and effectively managing patients who come to the emergency departments with sepsis or develop sepsis in an inpatient area. The project also aims to decrease sepsis-related deaths among inpatients.

“As representatives from each delivery network examined their procedures, they saw an opportunity to reduce unnecessary clinical variation and improve care for patients with sepsis,” said Scott Sussman, MD, senior medical director, Clinical Operations, YNHHS.

One of the first project components to launch were care bundles – sets of specific protocols and procedures for identifying and treating sepsis patients. These bundles include evidence-based practices research has shown to be effective, including best practices from different YNHHS delivery networks and national guidelines.

The clinical redesign teams implemented a change in Epic that makes it faster and easier for providers to order the care bundles because “time is critical” for patients with sepsis, said Jennifer Johnson, APRN, a consultant with YNHHS’ Office of Strategy Management (OSM). She and OSM consultant Anesta Williams, RN, lead the sepsis clinical redesign teams, which also include physicians, advanced practice providers and representatives from the Laboratory, Nursing, Pharmacy, Information Technology Services and other departments. The ED and inpatient groups also have Patient and Family Advisory Council (PFAC) members.

PFAC member Pat Caruso, who is on the ED group, brings unique qualifications to the project. Twice she had sepsis related to cancer treatment. She’s also a retired nurse with experience in emergency and critical care and safety and quality.

“This is a great opportunity for me to help physicians and staff identify and treat sepsis patients sooner,” she said. “I know from personal experience that not every patient displays typical sepsis symptoms, so it’s important for staff to really listen to what their patients are telling them. I think that with my experience, I can impact care for the next person.”

The clinical redesign teams are implementing other components of the project and will gather data to assess its effectiveness. The inpatient team includes Chuck Seelig (GH), Barbara Leafe (GH nursing), Sadia Gazi (BH), Ken Donovan (LMH), Melissa Swan (LMH nursing). The Emergency Department team includes Michelle Hepburn, (WH), Holly Vanbuskirk, LMH/Pequot Center, Kaschel, Shane, LMH, Ryan Carter (WH), Isaksen, Patricia (BH), Justin Cahill (BH), and Chris Davison (GH).

 

YNHHS adopts new CDC tuberculosis surveillance guidelines

In response to recent changes in CDC guidance for tuberculosis surveillance among healthcare workers, Yale New Haven Health is eliminating the requirement that members of the YNHHS medical staff complete yearly PPD (tuberculin) or IGRA (interferon gamma release assay) testing immediately. There will still be a requirement to document PPD or IGRA testing at the time of initial application for staff privileges. PPD or IGRA testing will also continue to be carried out whenever an unprotected exposure (as identified by YNHHS Infection Prevention) occurs with an immediate post-exposure test and follow-up testing 8-10 weeks later. Members of the medical staff who carry out clinical rotations in areas of the world endemic for tuberculosis (sites other than United States, Canada, New Zealand, Australia and Western Europe) for more than a week should have a pre-departure PPD or IGRA test done, as well as a follow-up test 8-10 weeks after return. YNHHS Occupational Health Clinics are available to members of the YNHHS medical staff to carry out such testing on a walk-in basis.

 

RSVP for the annual Summer Picnic

Rain or shine, there is always plenty of fun and food to be had at the annual Yale New Haven Medical Staff and House Staff Picnic at Holiday Hill, 43 Candee Road, Prospect. All members of the medical and house staffs are invited to attend the picnic, Thursday, July 25, 4:30 - 9:30 pm. RSVP by July 9 to Rose Elcsics. Please make sure to include the names of you and your guests, with the ages of children between 3 – 13. The popular picnic features kid-friendly activities and outdoor games such as sand volleyball, basketball, horseshoes and baseball as well as a lake for canoe races and paddling. Guests will also enjoy plenty of food and refreshments. Please be considerate when making your reservations. This event is sponsored by the Medical Staff who are financially responsible for those who do not attend or fail to cancel their reservation by July 9.

 

Adult Critical Care Team provides specialized care on wheels

Yale New Haven Health’s Y Access Transfer Center services are expanding with the launch of an adult Critical Care Team (CCT) and dedicated ambulance. The team consists of a critical-care nurse and critical-care paramedic trained to provide intensive care unit-level care during transit to Yale New Haven Hospital.

On the specially designed, critical-care ambulance, the team can perform specific treatments not possible in a typical ambulance. These include administering vasoactive medications (for blood vessels) or blood transfusions; caring for patients with a left ventricular assist device or intra-aortic balloon pump; and providing advanced airway and mechanical ventilation.

The CCT coordinates with the SkyHealth emergency helicopter team, and can transport critically injured or ill patients when the helicopter can’t – if the weather is bad or the patient is at a facility where aircraft activation is not practical. Currently, the adult CCT provides service 11 am to 11 pm within Connecticut and is deployed through the Y Access Transfer Center; 24-hour coverage will be provided in the near future.

Y Access Transfer Center at 888-YNHH-BED (888-964-4233) offers referring physicians a streamlined patient transfer service that ensures quick and easy admission to a Yale New Haven Health hospital. Visit ynhhs.org/providers/y-access.aspx to learn more.

critical care team

From left are: Leonard Guercia, assistant manager, YNHH Center for EMS, and Adult Critical Care Team members Fraser Weir, paramedic; Sara Preziosi, paramedic; Luis Velez, RN; Lynn Hayes, program coordinator; Dwight Carlone, paramedic; Nikki Loomis, RN; Steve Buhrer, RN; Michael Sullivan, RN; and Undrea Odette, paramedic; and Don MacMillan, PA-C, program manager.

 

Outpatient dental and oral maxillofacial services move to One Long Wharf Drive

All outpatient dental and oral maxillofacial services are now being provided at One Long Wharf Drive, 4th floor, Suite 404, in a new state-of-the-art facility. The program will no longer have access to on-campus dental and oral maxillofacial surgery outpatient clinics (Dana Adult Dental Clinic and SRC Oral Maxillofacial Clinic). Inpatient, emergency, and operating room dental and oral maxillofacial services will continue to be performed on campus in the operating rooms, on the floor, and in the Emergency Department.

Dental and oral maxillofacial services will continue to be available for consultation and “clearance” with minor workflow modifications:

  • “Day-call” resident will be available and on-campus 8 am – 5 pm to see consultations, emergencies, etc. Please refer to Amion. The “on call” resident will help coordinate care.
  • “Night call” will be the resident who is on-call for the specific dental service (i.e. Adult Dental, Pediatric Dental, and OMS).
  • Urgent dental and oral maxillofacial care that must be performed during the patient’s admission will be provided in the OR, special procedure room, ED or on the floors.
  • Urgent dental and oral maxillofacial care that can wait until after discharge will be provided in our outpatient clinic at One Long Wharf in a timely manner.
  • Dental clearance for Cardiology, Oncology, Radiation, Transplant, etc.:
    • Dental Clearance that must be performed during the patient’s admission:
      • Our resident staff will be able to perform a limited clinical and radiographic exam to rule-in / rule-out dental infection bedside (i.e. see the patient, perform limited clinical exam, obtain limited dental films as needed).
      • Please request “clearance consults” early in the management of your patients to allow our team time to coordinate care.
      • We will be able to perform dental care, as needed, in the OR, during their inpatient stay if they are unable to travel to the Long Wharf outpatient clinic to prepare them for medical clearance.
    • Dental clearance that can wait until after discharge:
      • Our team will provide a comprehensive clinical and radiographic exam and perform necessary procedures at our dental and oral maxillofacial clinic at One Long Wharf in an expedited manner. The Long Wharf dental clinic telephone number is 203-688-2464.

 

Project helps staff, patients and families prepare for life after the ICU

Physicians and staff on the Medical Intensive Care Unit are experts at treating patients with multiple, sometimes life-threatening, conditions. But the challenges these patients face can go beyond their medical conditions and hospital stays and in some cases, beyond the patients themselves.

Elaine Bonoan, PA-C, and Karen Marlett, PA-C, are shedding light on these challenges through a Post-ICU Outreach project on Yale New Haven Hospital’s MICU. Both are physician assistants with Northeast Medical Group who work with YNHH’s Hospitalist Service and Yale Medicine Pulmonary Critical Care group.

They were awarded a $10,000 IMPACT grant from the PA Foundation for their project, which focuses on post-intensive care syndrome (PICS). The syndrome encompasses physical, cognitive and/or psychosocial problems that remain after a critical illness and ICU stay, such as difficulty thinking clearly; anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress; muscle weakness; and others. Patients’ loved ones can be affected by PICS-F (post-intensive care syndrome – family).

Through the project, which launched in January, a PA-led liaison team identifies patients with or at high risk for PICS and implements measures to improve their inpatient and post-discharge care and experiences.

Bonoan said many healthcare professionals are familiar with PICS symptoms, but don’t know about the syndrome as a whole, so the Post-ICU Outreach project incorporates education for MICU staff and the public.

For patients and family members, they created a simple, one-page PICS fact sheet. They used grant funds to purchase journals where patients or loved ones can record information about medications, care-team members and other aspects of care, along with daily goals. The journals also have blank pages for “thoughts.”

Patients and families don’t have to share the journals with care-team members, but MICU staff who do see them find them helpful, Bonoan said. Ultimately, Bonoan and Marlett want to implement a consult service to follow patients after their ICU stays and help coordinate their care.

Caption: Elaine Bonoan, PA-C, (left) and Karen Marlett, PA-C, presented information about post intensive care syndrome at an information table during National Critical Care Awareness and Recognition Month in May.

 

YNHHS issues reminder about policy on giving and receiving gifts

Yale New Haven Health’s Gift and Gratuities Policy provides guidelines for employees on accepting and giving gifts and gratuities. These policies are in accordance with YNHHS’ values, Code of Conduct and Standards of Professional Behavior, along with federal anti-kickback laws.

YNHHS has a system-wide Gift and Gratuities Policy to avoid a conflict of interest or the appearance of a conflict of interest. The policy ensures that all employees practice and demonstrate equal treatment, unbiased professionalism and non-discriminatory actions in relation to all patients, vendors, suppliers, donors (potential and current) and any other individual or organization.

The policy defines “gifts” as tangible and intangible items of value without compensation. These include, but are not limited to: discounts, free or below-market-value goods or services, perishable and consumable goods, free promotional items and invitations/tickets to events or other benefits.

Key Gift and Gratuities Policy guidelines include:

  • YNHHS employees may not give gifts to patients.
  • YNHHS workforce members may not solicit or accept unsolicited gifts, regardless of amount.
  • Patients who wish to give gifts or donations should be advised that the YNHHS policy does not allow its workforce to accept gifts. Patients can be directed to the appropriate development or foundation office, which can accept the gift on behalf of the organization.
  • Deviation from our procedures is a policy violation.

For more information, see the YNHHS Gift and Gratuities Policy, available on the employee intranet under “Policies” in the top navigation bar. You may also email compliance@ynhh.org; or speak to your delivery network’s compliance and privacy officer.

 

Updated, approved System Policy and Procedures released

The following Yale New Haven Health policies and procedures were approved in April and May and can be found online:

  • Acute Dyspnea in Pulmonary Rehabilitation or Secondary Prevention Program
  • Angina Response in Pulmonary Rehabilitation or Secondary Prevention Program
  • Cardiopulmonary Arrest Policy for Pulmonary Rehabilitation or Secondary Prevention Program
  • Emergency Medical Services -- Access to Controlled Substances
  • Exercise Prescription Policy -- Pulmonary Rehabilitation
  • Hypertension in Pulmonary Rehabilitation or Secondary Prevention Program
  • Hypotension in Pulmonary Rehabilitation or Secondary Prevention Program
  • Interactions with Vendors
  • Tachycardia Policy for Pulmonary Rehabilitation or Secondary Prevention Program
  • Voluntary Paternity Establishment Program
  • Alternative Work Arrangements
  • Bradycardia Policy for Pulmonary Rehabilitation or Secondary Prevention Program
  • Chain of Command Communication
  • Controlled Substance Inventory
  • DEA Registration and Power of Attorney
  • Employee Records
  • Hyperglycemia in Pulmonary Rehabilitation or Secondary Prevention Program
  • Hypoglycemia in Pulmonary Rehabilitation or Secondary Prevention Program
  • Image Guided Radiation Therapy
  • IV Admixture Policy
  • Probationary and Orientation Periods
  • Transfer of Controlled Substances between DEA Registrants
  • Treatment Options (including Code Status and DNR)

 

Newsmakers

Raul J. Guzman, MD, was named surgeon-in-chief of Vascular Surgery, Heart and Vascular Center for Yale New Haven Health, chief of Vascular Surgery at Yale New Haven Hospital and division chief of Vascular Surgery, Yale School of Medicine as of June 3, 2019. Dr. Guzman earned his medical degree from Johns Hopkins University and completed his general surgery residency at Lenox Hill Hospital and cardiovascular and vascular surgery research at Stanford Medical Center. He most recently served as the director of Vascular Research at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and associate professor of surgery at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Guzman has held important roles on a number of national organizational committees including the New England Vascular Society, American Heart Association, American Diabetes Association and the North American Vascular Biology Organization. He received the Distinguished Fellow award in Vascular Surgery in 2013.

Dr. Guzman is a clinician-scientist whose primary contributions have been in the field of diabetic vascular disease with an interest in the cellular events and molecular pathways involved in arterial calcification. He has published various research articles, and he is a well-renowned regional, national and international speaker.

 

Alan Friedman, MD, professor of Pediatrics (Cardiology) at the Yale School of Medicine and medical director for Medical Affairs, Yale New Haven Health System Office of the Chief Medical Officer, is assuming responsibility for medical leadership of the Patient Experience and Physician Experience as the Chief Medical Experience Officer. In this role, he will work in collaboration with Joan Kelly, YNHHS chief patient experience officer. Dr. Friedman received his medical degree from Wayne State University and completed his pediatric residency at Children's Memorial Hospital / Northwestern University in Chicago. He has been part of the Yale New Haven Health System family since 1991, when he joined Yale New Haven Hospital as a pediatric cardiology fellow. An active clinician, former program director of the Pediatric Residency Program and previous interim chief of Pediatric Cardiology, Dr. Friedman served as the president of the Yale New Haven Hospital Medical Staff from 2012-2014. He has taken on a number of system-wide leadership roles, including oversight of the Professionalism Peer Review Process and the CLEAR program. He will continue to lead these initiatives in his new role.

Sandip Mukherjee, MD, who currently serves as medical director of Physician Liaison Services, medical director of the Aortic Institute at Yale New Haven Hospital and associate professor of Clinical Medicine at the Yale School of Medicine, will take on the role of executive medical director for Complex Medical Care and Concierge Medicine for the Office of the Chief Medical Officer. In this new role, Dr. Mukherjee will work closely with Yale Medicine, Northeast Medical Group and community physician leadership to build a comprehensive concierge medicine practice, attracting patients from all over the region, the country and beyond. He will also work with clinical leadership to ensure the appropriate management of complex patients. Dr. Mukherjee is uniquely suited for this role having spent nearly 25 years building a robust cardiovascular practice with the former Cardiology Associates of New Haven group and Yale Medicine. He received his MD degree from Texas Tech University, and completed his internal medicine residency, chief residency and cardiology fellowship training at Yale New Haven Hospital.

Joni Hansson, MD, past president of the Yale New Haven Hospital Medical Staff and associate professor of Clinical Medicine at the Yale School of Medicine, will take on the role of medical director for Medical Staff Communication. Over the last few years, Dr. Hansson has been instrumental in leading the development of the medical staff engagement surveys and working with departments to develop improvement plans. In her new role, she will collaborate with clinical leadership to develop a robust physician engagement and communication plan. An active member of the New Haven Community for over 30 years, she obtained her MD degree from Yale University and completed her internal medicine residency and nephrology fellowship training at Yale New Haven Hospital. She is currently a full-time clinical nephrologist with Metabolism Associates.

 

Teams receive top honors at annual Safety, Quality and Experience Conference

Approximately 1,400 people from across Yale New Haven Health and Yale University attended the 2019 Safety, Quality and Experience Conference June 5 at the Oakdale Theatre, Wallingford. The conference showcased more than 50 juried project initiatives that addressed best practices in clinical redesign, general performance improvement, patient experience and patient safety.

conference winner

A YNHH team was named delivery network winner for clinical redesign for the project “Pre-operative Optimization Of Total Joint Arthroplasty Patients Decreases Readmissions and Promotes Patient Engagement.” Members are (front row, l-r): Christen Nelson, RN, Mary O’Connor, MD and Dannielle Stone, RN. Back row (l-r) are: Gail Haesche, RN, Olukemi Akande, MD, Jensa Morris, MD, and Anne Moore, DNP. Not pictured are: Lee Rubin, MD, David Gibson, MD, Jill Zafar, MD, Lorraine Novella, RN, Heidi Rillstone, RN, and Vikki Winks, PT-C.

conference winner

A YNHH team was named category winner for patient safety for the project “The Durable Impact of a Multifaceted Effort by Surgical Trainees to Minimize the Prescription of Postoperative Opioids.” Team members are (l-r): Peter Yoo, MD, Alexander Chiu, MD, and Raymond Jean, MD. Not pictured: Mollie Freedman-Weiss, MD.

conference winner

A YNHH team was the delivery network winner in the patient safety category for the project “Universal Protocol: The Path to Zero Patient Harm in the Non-Operative Setting.” Team members are, front row (l-r): Jeannette Bronsord, RN, Jacqueline Richo, RN, and Darcy Hennessey, RN. Back: Leslie Hutchins, RN, and William Cushing, PA. Not pictured: Maxwell Laurans, MD, and Victoria Dahl Vickers, RN.

conference winner

A YNHH team was the delivery network winner in the patient experience category for the project “Impact of Health System Specialty Pharmacy Services on Medication Adherence in Pediatric Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.” Team members are, front row (l-r): Sarah Kelly, PharmD, Talia Papiro, PharmD, and Martha Stutsky, PharmD. Back row: Mitchell DelVecchio, PharmD, (left) and Vincent Tao, PharmD.

conference winner

A Yale Medicine team was named delivery network winner in the general performance category for the project “Evaluating the Impact of the Oncology Extended Care Clinic on Emergency Department Visit Rates.” Members are (front row, l-r): Maureen Canavan, PhD, Bonnie Gould Rothberg, MD, PhD, and Tannaz Sedghi. Back row are Tracy Carafeno, RN, (left) and Kerin Adelson, MD. Not pictured: Amy Davidoff, PhD, Cary Gross, MD, Michael Strait, JD, Naralys Sinanis and Maureen Raucci, RN.

conference winner

A YNHHS team was named general performance improvement category winner for the project “Impact of a Pharmacist Driven Anti-Xa Level Monitoring Protocol on Therapeutic Drug Monitoring Practice Patterns.” Members are Kent Owusu, Pharm D, and Martha Stutsky, PharmD. Not pictured are Muhammad Effendi, Pharm D, and Alfred Lee, MD.

conference winner

A YNHHS team was named delivery network winner for patient safety for the project “Enhancing the Safe Use of Vancomycin Across Yale New Haven Health System Through a Vancomycin Medication Administration Record Level.” Team members are front row (l-r): Laura De Vaux, RN, Jeffrey Topal, MD, and Dayna McManus, Pharm D. Back row (l-r) are: Sunish Shah, PharmD, Leslie Hutchins, RN, and Ginger Rouse, Pharm D. Not pictured: Eric Tichy, Pharm D.

 

Upcoming Events

Yale New Haven Medical Staff and House Staff Picnic, July 25, 4:30 - 9:30 pm, Holiday Hill, 43 Candee Road, Prospect. All members of the medical and house staffs are invited to attend. RSVP by July 9 to Rose Elcsics at rose.elcsics@ynhh.org.

The 5th Annual Wound Science Symposium, Sept. 13, 7:30 am – 4 pm, Trumbull Marriott, 180 Hawley Lane, Trumbull, CT. Keynote speaker is Jeffrey Levine, MD, AGSF, CMD, a nationally recognized expert in wound care, pressure injuries and geriatrics. The symposium is hosted by the Wound Centers of Bridgeport Hospital, Greenwich Hospital, Lawrence + Memorial Hospital and Yale New Haven Hospital. Contact hours/CME credits available. Call for early registration: 888-357-2396.

 

In memoriam

John Aversa, MD, 76, passed away June 4, 2019. He joined the YNHH medical staff in 1975. Dr. Aversa’s career as an orthopedic surgeon spanned 48 years. He was an attending surgeon at Yale New Haven Hospital and chief of orthopedic surgery and president of staff at the former Hospital of Saint Raphael. He was a partner at Connecticut Orthopedic Specialists since 1975 where he was instrumental in its growth and success. Dr. Aversa also served as a general surgeon in Morocco as a lieutenant commander in the U.S. Navy from 1969-1972 and remained in the Naval Reserves for many years. For more on Dr. Aversa’s life and work, read his obituary.

Michael Parker, MD, 67, of Madison, died May 21, 2019. An internist, Dr. Parker joined the medical staff in 1985. He received his medical degree from Baylor College of Medicine. He practiced at Internal Medicine of East Haven. Read his obituary for more on Dr. Parker’s legacy.